The Hidden Brook Press
North Shore Series
of
Canadian Literature

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HBP is proud to present

the third set of 5 books in the
North Shore Series!




Order any of these book


by contacting the publisher at
writers@HiddenBrookPress.com
613-475-2368


or

 order from your local bookstore. 

(
A TIP: If you order from your local bookstore
you will not have to pay delivery.
Give them the isbn, the title,
our email address and our phone number
and they will order it from us with their purchase order number.
They don't have to pay for the book in advance so it is even quicker.)





See more about other books in the series and a note to future authors.
We hope you will take a look at this URL.
http://www.hiddenbrookpress.com/Book-NShore.html









Third set of five books  - Click on the title to see larger cover and info about authors.

— Shane Joseph – Cobourg – "Fringe Dwellers"
     – Short Stories  –
ISBN – 978-1-897475-11-9

— Mark Clement – Cobourg–
"Island In the Shadow"  -
     – Poetry  –
ISBN – 978-1-897475-08-9

— Anthony Donnelly – Brighton–
"Fishbowl Fridays"  -
     – Prose  –
ISBN – 978-1-897475-02-7

— Deborah Panko – Cobourg– "Somewhat Elsewhere"  -
     – Poetry  –
ISBN – 978-1-897475-13-3

— Chris  Faiers – Marmora – "ZenRiver Poems & Haibun"  -
     – Prose  – ISBN – 978-1-897475-25-6








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— Shane Joseph – Cobourg – "Fringe Dwellers"  
     – Short Stories  –
ISBN – 978-1-897475-11-9
     – $19.95
 
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About "Fringe Dwellers":

Sid's a war-hero and a bum, Gloria's a beautiful luckless lover, Andrew's a writer whose favourite haunt is the cemetery, and Julia is a priest with a dying congregation in a booming suburb. What have they in common? They are the Fringe Dwellers – people who once led normal lives until a sudden twist in the road sent them out onto the fringes of society. From the fringe they claw back meaning and redemption for their altered lives.

Why does Harry pretend that everything is normal when his whole life is falling apart? Or Professor Ram hunger for his attractive landlady while under an oath of celibacy? Or paralysed Nelly dread the touch of her brother; while Beatrice strips for her lover when he returns from his wife's funeral? Are these people nuts? Or given their circumstances, would you have acted the same?

Find out, in these twelve touching stories of human endeavour against loss, circumstance and marginalization.



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Author Bio Note:

Shane Joseph is a graduate of the Humber School for Writers. He began writing as a teenager living in Sri Lanka and has never stopped. Redemption in Paradise, his first novel, was published in 2004. He has completed three other novels, After the Flood – a dystopian story set in the aftermath of global warming, The Ulysses Man – an odyssey of the immigrant experience in Canada, and In the Shadow of the Conquistador – a tale of romance and redemption in the Peruvian Andes. His short stories on Canadian themes have appeared in Existere, in three Canadian anthologies and in literary journals in Sri Lanka and India.

His career stints include: stage and radio actor, pop musician, encyclopaedia salesman, lathe machine operator, airline executive, travel agency manager, vice president of a global financial services company and management consultant.

Self-taught, with four degrees under his belt obtained through distance education, Shane is an avid traveller and has visited one country for every year of his life and lived in four of them. He fondly recalls incidents during his travels as real lessons he could never have learned in school: husky riding in Finland with no training, trekking the Inca Trail in Peru through an unending rainstorm, hitch-hiking in Australia without a map, escaping a wild elephant in Zambia, and being stranded without money in Denmark, are some of his memories.

After immigrating (twice), raising a family, building a career, and experiencing life's many highs and lows, Shane has carved out a niche in Cobourg, Ontario with his wife Sarah, where he continues to write stories and play his guitar.

Shane Joseph, believes in the gift of second chances. He feels that he has lived many lives in just a single lifetime, always starting from scratch with only the lessons from the past to draw upon. His novels and stories reflect the redemptive power of acceptance and forgiveness. "Writing fiction is an avenue to record these experiences, to mine art within the struggle of life, and, even though I may never achieve it, to pursue a holy and noble grail."


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A Review by Donna Langevin:

Immigrants, businessmen, professors, librarians, computer wizards, tradespeople, panhandlers, alcoholics, victims of incest, two ghosts who meet in the cemetery: what do these members of the enormous cast of author Shane Joseph’s characters have in common?
 
Highly readable and suspenseful, there is a common quest for well-being and happiness that unifies the cast. However, it is the individual journeys that makes this book of short stories fascinating. Each character is a “fringe dweller” not necessarily because of economic status, social class or being a newcomer to Canada, but because he or she often has a past that has shut others out. The consequences are lives in which loneliness and isolation are paramount. Thus, each character must seek a kind of “personal redemption” by confronting the past in order to move on in positive ways.

Sound familiar? Dostoevski, Conrad and many other writers have wrestled with a similar theme as their protagonists engaged in life’s struggles.

Shane Joseph who obviously draws on his own experience as an immigrant and his many career stints to create a sense of reality, dares to offer some plausible solutions. One’s fate is never changed by anything as momentous as a lightning bolt, miracle, winning a lottery or grand religious enlightenment. On the pilgrimage toward redemption the only “angels” in Fringe Dwellers are the flawed but kindly strangers encountered by chance. In Virtual Guy, a software consultant offers to share his hotel room with a business man when their flight is canceled due to a snowstorm. Their interaction enables the latter to move on after his divorce and to revamp his career. In the title story, Vinod, an immigrant from India befriends Sid, an embittered war veteran. He drives him to a hospital where the staff are so caring that Sid ends up working at a hospice after his recovery. In Silence, Andrew a busy executive who had neglected his wife goes to a weekend retreat. As he holds the hand of a dying old man, he realizes “at that moment it was a good proxy” for his  wife who passed away while he was on a business trip. Thus, simple acts of kindness and compassion allow the characters to atone and to reach out again.  In the powerful  Let My People Stay, this theme is played out on a grander scale. When her congregation of elderly white people becomes excluded by a Chinese congregation using her church, Rev. Julia Styles holds an outdoor service where all immigrant groups are welcome. 

Sound preachy or simplistic? Shane Joseph is too thoughtful a writer to fall into the trap of  formulaic writing. Sometimes a character is beyond salvation. In Rage, the woman suffering from incest finds release rather than redemption by murdering her brother. In many other stories the secondary characters fall by the wayside because they lack insight and the compassion that make change possible.

The well-crafted Fringe Dwellers is an appealing read because of the reliable and relevant theme of “second chances.”


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— Mark Clement – Cobourg– "Island In The Shadow"  
     – Poetry  –
ISBN – 978-1-897475-08-9
     – $15.95

      


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About "Island In The Shadow":

Mark Clement, in Islands in the Shadow, does what poems best do; they evoke places and times forgotten and familiar. The reader will hear them clearly in the mind’s ear for they are in that fine tradition where poetry has more than meets the eye. Since Robert Frost, there has not been anyone like Mark Clement for encounters with the natural world. His adventures and returns make visible a uniquely detailed, precarious landscape of the mind that we couldn’t discover without him. When one sees the images in his voice and hears the words on the page you will realize you are being presented poems by a true craftsman. Clement reaches beyond the vocabulary and grammar of other poets with a skill that comes from the love of both words and nature.


Author Bio Note:

Mark Clement is recently retired and lives with his wife Margaret in the quiet town of Cobourg Ontario. Mark went to highschool in Cornwall Ontario and in 1958 had his first poem published in the St. Lawrence highschool yearbook. Following highschool, Mark attended what is now called a 'community college' and became a technocrat in the field of electronics. Work and family life overtook poetry and Mark didn't begin writing again until the mid '70s. Since that time, he has become increasingly active in the world of poetry and since his retirement, poetry has changed from an avocation to an almost full-time job.

Today, Mark has non-paying jobs as webmaster and doing the layout of chapbooks and anthologies for The Ontario Poetry Society.  In between, he manages to write a poem or two and participate in the local Cobourg Poetry Workshop.  This is Mark's first full collection of poetry.



3 Blurbs:

These poems do what poems best do; they evoke places and times forgotten and familiar. I think them aloud. I hear them in the mind’s ear for they are in that fine tradition where poetry has more than meets the eye.
–  Eric Winter

When he is heard at readings – and when his images are seen on the page – the way he makes words work causes you to know that Mark Clement sees the creation of poetry as artisanship. Vocabulary, grammar and just about all the devices known to ‘the poetic race’ are wielded with a dexterity that tells us Mark would refuse to settle for the title wordsmith; with “Islands in the Shadow,” he aspires to be nothing less than a master craftsman.
James Pickersgill

Since Robert Frost, there has not been anyone like Mark Clement for encounters with the natural world. His adventures and returns make visible a uniquely detailed, precarious landscape of the mind that we couldn’t discover without him.
–  I.B. Iskov, Founder, The Ontario Poetry Society






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— Anthony Donnelly – Brighton– "Fishbowl Fridays"  
     – Prose  – ISBN – 978-1-897475-02-7
     – $15.95
 
 


About "Fishbowl Fridays":

This premier collection of short stories is a booming start for this young author’s career. At this early stage his work has already been compared to the short fiction of James Reaney and Margaret Atwood.  Be willing to be caught off guard by Donnelly’s imagination that teeters between fantasy and a warped sense of reality. You will not be sorry you invested time in reading this collection.  Even though his topics may sometimes portray the mundane there is nothing mundane about the way he uses language to fill in the extraordinary details of life.


Author Bio Note:

Anthony Donnelly is a 25-year-old writer from Brighton, Ontario. He has degrees from Trent and Queen’s and is currently completing an MA in  English Literature. Most of his time is spent reading, writing, or with family and friends. He is the founder and editor of On Broken Glass, an Ontario literary magazine and his writing has been  published in various magazines in Canada and   Europe.


Blurbs:

“In the tradition of Ontario Gothic, Fishbowl Fridays,Anthony Donnelly's premier story collection, invites comparison to the short fiction of James Reaney and Margaret Atwood.  By turns  realistic  and  magical,  natural and bizarre, the reader is immersed in a world where lingering in the moment may yield something worth knowing. The final event of the  closing story leaves us with an image which folds backwards into what comes before,  suggesting as in  the words of  Octavio Paz that  “life is a marvel'' and that from the cold bed  of  the page we see  the sandpiper taking flight with a frog in its beak and think for a moment we know what that means.”

-John B. Lee


“Whether in the mode of a skewed realism or more outright  fantasy,  Anthony  Donnelly’s  stories  are  strongly  imagined and get  under your skin.  They convince and reveal,  even as they disconcert and catch you off guard.   This in an impressive  debut collection  by a skillful,   versatile and  abundantly talented young writer.”

- Allan Briesmaster, founder of Art Bar - Toronto, author and publisher

Reviews:

Fishbowl Fridays – a review by Shane Joseph

Twenty-five year old Anthony Donnely shows a remarkable insight into characters ranging from young children to seniors. His stories are edgy and circular, often returning to a symbol (the phantom arm in Do You Fear the Bright Lights?), a character (Amy in Jukebox Organ) or an action (retribution in Horseshoe Falls).

Images of churches turned into bars, sandpipers getting their frog, geldings kicking back, and transplanted limbs are well used in context of the stories they appear in.

His grip on narration is strong and drives the stories forward, although sometimes I would have liked to have seen some scenes lengthened with dialogue and some characters drawn out more – they have such potential for depth. That said, I read this book in one sitting; Donnely’s stories are crisp and short enough to grab the reader and move him on.

The stories in this tiny collection range from closed-loop, well plotted ones (Dancing on the Sandpiper’s Ruins, Horseshoe Falls) to open-ended, slice-of-life portraits (Reflections in a Muddy Puddle and Machanon: A Triptych). Two stories, the title one, Fishbowl Fridays, and The Divine Transfiguration of False Idols, are written in the same setting around a carnival campground, from different character viewpoints but conclude in similar endings – I wasn’t sure if this was deliberate but it hinted of an opportunity lost for enlarging the canvas upon which these stories could have been drawn. The character Eric, who appears in these two stories, and in some others, seems like the writer’s alter-ego, but I had difficulty getting a fix on him as he possesses chameleon like traits and morphs from good guy to bad guy between stories. And if the titles listed above are example enough, I found Donnely’s ability to come up with interesting story names to be quite stunning, given the content that lies beneath.

My one piece of developmental critique is that this should have been a larger collection. I hope that Donnely will continue to develop Eric and weave him around these and other stories in the future into a much bigger collection that will have a common unifying theme running around it. Yet, I am impressed by his voice, technique and his ability to extract sensation and plausible quirkiness from his characters and situations.

I will eagerly await his next book. A great writer-in-the-making has just arrived on the North Shore.

 

Shane Joseph
author of Fringe Dwellers and  Redemption in Paradise







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— Deborah Panko – Cobourg– "Somewhat Elsewhere"  
     – Poetry  –
ISBN – 978-1-897475-13-3
     – $15.95


 

About "Somewhat Elsewhere":

No writer has full control of what is to be revealed to the reader but Deborah Panko with her marvelous facility with language comes pretty close.  There’s no need to read between the lines and spend time figuring out just what she is trying to say. From the quotidian to the eternal, from the simple to the profound; from end to end, the reader will be wholly engaged and not a little surprised by the shouts of joy and the wry humour that pops up in surprising places. Deborah Panko touches on love, madness, nature and humankind, all with language that strips away the conventions of norm and leads the reader into her own personal reality. In her exuberant, sometimes playful and passionate ways, Deborah Panko is a true master of poetry.  From start to finish this book is written in the language of life.


Author Bio Note:

Deborah Panko grew up in Thorold, Ontario near Niagara Falls, moving to Toronto to attend university. Early on, she held a variety of jobs from waitressing to crematorium receptionist to registered massage therapist, finally settling into a teaching ‘career’ that had begun with English as a Second Language in Algeria in 1973.  Being  a  prolific  dreamer,  she  kept dream journals as a record of her inner travels. Their images and patterns led to poetry writing.

Wanting to spend more time on personally creative pursuits, she retired early from the Toronto Board of Education where she had taught a variety of courses, her favourite being Writer’s Craft. She and her husband, Ron, moved to Cobourg in 2004, where she happily discovered other poetry writers at the Cobourg Poetry Workshop.  Poetry writing is her habit along with biking, playing the piano, watching birds and reading the classics.

Blurbs:

Here is love, madness, nature and outrageous humankind, each in language that strips away sweet convention and thrusts before us a different reality, the memory of which finds “no final resting place.”
Wayne Schlepp


No writer has full control of what is to be revealed.  This one comes pretty close.  There’s no need to read between the lines. From the quotidian to the eternal, from the simple to the profound; from end to end, the reader will be wholly engaged and not a little surprised by the shouts of joy and the wry humour that pops up in surprising places.
Eric Winter


In her exuberant, over-spilling, playful and passionate ways, Deborah Panko is a genuine manifestation among us that poetry – in whatever form, in all its forms – is the first language, the Protean response to, and participant in, the urgencies – inner and outer – of being alive.
Ken Lewis






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— Chris Faiers – Marmora – "ZenRiver Poems & Haibun"  
     – Prose  – ISBN – 978-1-897475-25-6
     – $15.95

 

      

About "ZenRiver Poems & Haibun":


This collection is a haibun, a combination of prose interspersed with haiku. The form was created by its master, Matsuo Basho, who developed it writing travel sketches of fifteenth century Japan. Basho's entire life was devoted to the twin pursuits of writing haiku and deepening his Zen Buddhist spirituality. Late in life Basho left his monastic poet's hut to make a series of difficult pilgrimages across the islands of medieval Japan. With  these barebones narratives and profound haiku, Basho revealed the interstitial spaces enlightened poets share with nature in subtle but brilliant flashes of  satori.

Haiku poet (haijin) Chris Faiers has been writing haiku for forty years, and his poems have consistently been at the forefront in the development of English language haiku and haibun. His haibun are written in Basho's tradition, one of simple but powerful language, and his goal is also  to gently share his vision.

The most casual reading of ZenRiver Poems & Haibun will reveal worlds familiar to both the practitioner of Zen and the First Nations shaman.  



Author Bio Note:

Chris Faiers was born on Hamilton Mountain in 1948. He has been a leader in the creation of English language haiku and haibun for forty years. He has been meditating for the same period. His online haibun, “Eel Pie Dharma”, is likely the most widely read English language haibun.

His poetry has been published in at about 100 literary magazines, antholologies and scholary texts. This is his seventeenth collection. His poems have been praised by Irving Layton, Al Purdy, and Beatle George Harrison.

“Fishing with Big Blue” in this book has been ranked number one for “Shaman Haibun” in Google for over a year. Chris spends his days caretaking his Buddhist retreat, ZenRiver Gardens, on the toenails of the Canadian Shield. 



Blurb:
This collection is a haibun, a combination of prose interspersed with haiku. Haiku poet (haijin) Chris Faiers has been writing haiku for forty years, and his poems have consistently been at the forefront in the development of English language haiku and haibun. The most casual reading of ZenRiver Poems & Haibun will reveal worlds familiar to both the practitioner of Zen and the First Nations shaman.








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Dear Authors:

If you live in the North Shore Series area – generally speaking between Port Hope and Kingston, south of #7 – then you might want to take a look at the submission info at – http://www.hiddenbrookpress.com/b-NShore.html.

We look forward to hearing from you.

All the best.

Richard M. Grove,
Publisher